History

//History

The Oklahomans: The Story of Oklahoma and Its People

The unforgettable saga of America’s last frontier-the Oklahoma Country. Never has the story of this great land and people been told like John J. Dwyer does it. Storybook, history book, coffee table book. Featuring the same colorful and readable format that has helped make his “The War Between the States: America’s Uncivil War” a success, “The Oklahomans (Volume 1, Ancient-Statehood),” chronicles the saga of the winning-and losing-of a land. Some of the most famous cowboys, Indians, lawmen, outlaws, and explorers in American history stride across the pages of this unforgettable story. So do some of the country’s greatest entrepreneurs, statesmen, Christian ministers, social pioneers, and athletes.

  • : John J. Dwyer
  • : Red River Press
  • : 11/15/2016
  • : 0985347023
  • : 978-0985347024
  • : https://vimeo.com/190806461
  • : ghobbsus@gmail.com
  • : Grant Hobbs
2017-05-09T08:44:34+00:00 History, Staff Pick|0 Comments

The Source of Immortality

If we want to see this future we have to understand the present by looking at a past of electromagnetic levitation, UFO’s, Mayan crystal communication devises, Egyptian water pumps, prehistoric holographic images and remarkably strange evolution’s in light and sound.

  • : Maria Anna van Driel
  • : united P.C.
  • : 07/22/2016
  • : 3710323851
  • : 978-3710323850
  • : https://youtu.be/tuSYMkbpM1U
  • : marian1919@live.nl
  • : Maria Anna van Driel
  • : http://nexttruth.com/
2017-05-08T23:35:13+00:00 History|0 Comments

Holy Roman Empire: Battle of Krakow

An introductory novel of a book series project created by a group of artists hailing from the Czech Republic and the United Kingdom. The Holy Roman Empire series is an amalgamation of Historical Fiction and Historical Fantasy, set in our world’s medieval times. Battle of Krakow begins this colossus through the undertaking of a war between the titular Holy Roman Empire and their eastern, closest neighbour – the Kingdom of Poland.

  • : Denis Habulinec
  • : 05/12/2017
  • : 978-80-260-6012-3
  • : https://youtu.be/wQ2idb44bzA
  • : denis.habulinec@gmail.com
  • : Jan Cechl

Middle East Affairs: War Adventures of Zahos Hadjifotiou in Tobruk, El Alamein and Rimini

“A World War II veteran recounts firsthand horrors on bloody battlefields and passionate liaisons in Middle Eastern nightclubs as a Grecian soldier.

Hadjifotiou’s (Games of Passion in Mykonos, 2015) life was interrupted by war, with Mussolini’s invasion of Greece spurring him to leave home and join the fight against the Axis powers. He enlisted in the British army and found himself in the port city of Tobruk, Libya. Here, he was one of history’s famous “Desert Rats”—men who spent eight months of hell under siege by Field Marshal Erwin Rommel’s troops: “Thirty-five thousand wounded and several thousand dead.” Hadjifotiou’s reputation as one of Tobruk’s heroes afforded him numerous promotions and military decorations. He was eventually assigned to pilot a crane named “Mac” to salvage Allied vehicles and save trapped soldiers. Between the siege and battles against German forces in both El Alamein, Egypt, and Rimini, Italy, he spent many of his nights with fellow soldiers acting out in the urbane nightclubs of Egypt, and later Beirut, seeking pleasure and luxury with alcohol and women. The author recalls his wartime adventures with a dry romanticism, never shying away from his experiences, be they vodka-fueled nights or hand-to-hand combat on the battlefield. Hadjifotiou is short-tempered and apolitical, prone to nostalgia in unexpected ways—the soldier recalls his crane with more sentimentality than his whirlwind marriage to a French general’s daughter. When reunited with his lost love, Yuki Russell, a Jewish-American singer he met early in the war, his enthusiasm will likely seem shocking to some, as he seemed to have all but forgotten her before. There’s no sugarcoating these oddities, no rationalizations made for these arrogant or reckless turns any more than for the heroic ones. The closest the book comes to indemnifying the actions of any—from womanizing to looting—is to maintain that those who were not there cannot know. The autobiography is remarkably concise, perhaps to its detriment—it’s unlikely readers will feel transported to nightclubs or war zones with its minimalist approach.

A pithy and unapologetic memoir, as much about the good times of war as the bad.”

— Kirkus Reviews

August 19, 2016

  • : Zahos Hadjifotiou
  • : Stergiou Limited
  • : 08/20/16
  • : 1910370827
  • : 9781910370827
  • : B01KR73B4C
  • : https://youtu.be/xSVIgehGWNE
  • : admin@stergioultd.com
  • : Film14
  • : http://www.film-14.com/

The Edge of Nowhere

The year is 1992 and Victoria Hastings Harrison Greene—reviled matriarch of a sprawling family—is dying.

After surviving the Oklahoma Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, Victoria refuses to leave this earth before revealing the secrets she’s carried for decades.
Once the child of a loving family during peaceful times, a shocking death shattered her life. Victoria came face to face with the harshness of the world. As the warm days of childhood receded to distant memory, Victoria learns to survive.

No matter what it takes.

To keep her family alive in an Oklahoma blighted by dust storms and poverty, Victoria makes choices—harsh ones, desperate ones. Ones that eventually made her into the woman her grandchildren fear and whisper about. Ones that kept them all alive. Hers is a tale of tragedy, love, murder, and above all, the conviction to never stop fighting.

Symphony for the City of the Dead

In September 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history—almost three years of bombardment and starvation that culminated in the harsh winter of 1943–1944. More than a million citizens perished. Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, their relatives having neither the means nor the strength to bury them. Residents burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and—eventually—one another to stay alive. Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet government itself was composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who would write a symphony that roused, rallied, eulogized, and commemorated his fellow citizens—the Leningrad Symphony, which came to occupy a surprising place of prominence in the eventual Allied victory.

This is the true story of a city under siege: the triumph of bravery and defiance in the face of terrifying odds. It is also a look at the power—and layered meaning—of music in beleaguered lives. Symphony for the City of the Dead is a masterwork thrillingly told and impeccably researched by National Book Award–winning author M. T. Anderson.
National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson delivers a brilliant and riveting account of the Siege of Leningrad and the role played by Russian composer Shostakovich and his Leningrad Symphony.

2015-12-07T22:16:53+00:00 History, Non-Fiction, Young Adult|Comments Off on Symphony for the City of the Dead

Symphony for the City of the Dead

In September 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history—almost three years of bombardment and starvation that culminated in the harsh winter of 1943–1944. More than a million citizens perished. Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, their relatives having neither the means nor the strength to bury them. Residents burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and—eventually—one another to stay alive. Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet government itself was composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who would write a symphony that roused, rallied, eulogized, and commemorated his fellow citizens—the Leningrad Symphony, which came to occupy a surprising place of prominence in the eventual Allied victory.

This is the true story of a city under siege: the triumph of bravery and defiance in the face of terrifying odds. It is also a look at the power—and layered meaning—of music in beleaguered lives. Symphony for the City of the Dead is a masterwork thrillingly told and impeccably researched by National Book Award–winning author M. T. Anderson.
National Book Award winner M. T. Anderson delivers a brilliant and riveting account of the Siege of Leningrad and the role played by Russian composer Shostakovich and his Leningrad Symphony.

2015-12-07T22:16:39+00:00 History, Non-Fiction, Young Adult|Comments Off on Symphony for the City of the Dead

The Boy Who Fell Off the Mayflower, or John Howland’s Good Fortune

In the first book he has both written and illustrated, master artist P.J. Lynch brings a Mayflower voyager’s story to vivid life.

At a young age, John Howland learned what it meant to take advantage of an opportunity. Leaving the docks of London on the Mayflower as an indentured servant to Pilgrim John Carver, John Howland little knew that he was embarking on the adventure of a lifetime. By his great good fortune, John survived falling overboard on the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean, and he earned his keep ashore by helping to scout a safe harbor and landing site for his bedraggled and ill shipmates. Would his luck continue to hold amid the dangers and adversity of the Pilgrims’ lives in New England? John Howland’s tale is masterfully told in his own voice, bringing an immediacy and young perspective to the oft-told Pilgrims’ story. P.J. Lynch captures this pivotal moment in American history in precise and exquisite detail, from the light on the froth of a breaking wave to the questioning voice of a teen in a new world.

2015-12-07T22:07:45+00:00 Children's, History|Comments Off on The Boy Who Fell Off the Mayflower, or John Howland’s Good Fortune

Painter’s Daughter

Sophie Dupont assists her father in his studio, keeping her own artwork out of sight. In private, she paints the picturesque north Devon coast, popular with artists–including handsome Wesley Overtree, who seems more interested in Sophie than the landscape.

Captain Stephen Overtree is accustomed to taking on his brother Wesley’s responsibilities. Near the end of his leave, he is sent to find his brother and bring him home. Upon reaching Devonshire, however, Stephen is stunned to learn Wesley has sailed for Italy and left his host’s daughter in serious trouble.

Stephen feels duty-bound to act, and strangely protective of the young lady, who somehow seems familiar. Wanting to make some recompense for his own past failings as well as his brother’s, Stephen proposes to Miss Dupont. He does not offer love, but marriage “in name only” to save her from scandal. If he dies in battle, as he fears, she will at least be a respectable widow.

Desperate for a way to escape her predicament, Sophie finds herself torn between her first love and this brooding man she barely knows. Dare she wait for Wesley to return? Or should she elope with the captain and pray she doesn’t come to regret it?

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS INCLUDED

  • : Julie Klassen
  • : Bethany House Publisher
  • : 12/01/2015
  • : 9780764210723
  • : 978-0764210723
  • : 9781441228802
  • : https://youtu.be/zh22iBz1Fxs
  • : Brittany.Higdon@bethanyhouse.com
  • : Bethany House Publishers
2017-04-18T18:33:49+00:00 Faith Based, Fiction, Historical Fiction, History, Literary|Comments Off on Painter’s Daughter

Lavi: The United States, Israel and a Controversial Fighter Jet

Endorsed by President Reagan on the White House lawn on November 29, 1983, and opposed by his own Secretary of Defense, the Lavi became the largest bi-national program in the history of U.S.-Israel relations.

Aimed at providing Israel with a fighter-bomber uniquely suited to Israel’s requirements, the Lavi became a microcosm for both the U.S.-Israel relationship, and for Israeli society itself: a study in the ambitions, fears, and internal divisions that have shaped each of them.

The story behind this landmark program is scheduled for publication in January 2016, and is available now for pre-order.

2015-11-22T15:30:17+00:00 History, Non-Fiction|Comments Off on Lavi: The United States, Israel and a Controversial Fighter Jet

Looking for Lulu

The Falklands War ends, Grace Kelly and Leonid Brezhnev die, West Germany chooses a new Chancellor and Time magazine selects the computer as Machine of the Year.

In the same year, a dysfunctional Glasgow newspaperman tapes a late-night conversation with a drunken German prison officer who, within a few days, is murdered. When the victim’s chilling tale of a wartime British spy called Lulu begins to unravel the reporter knows he has stumbled on the scoop of a lifetime. But two governments, an opportunist female colleague, a weary Stuttgart detective and a remorseless killer are on the same trail, and all have agendas of their own.

As the search moves from Scotland to Germany and France the detective and the reporter – two men who are worlds apart – are forced into an unlikely alliance until the shattering finale in the Forest of Fontainebleau.

Looking for Lulu is a story about the double burden of secrecy and loss and a family’s search for ultimate redemption.

2015-10-20T16:18:23+00:00 History|0 Comments

Gone: The Titanic

Alva Lynn Cartwright, the RMS Titanic with her mother and her sister. With a marriage arranged by her mother, she is to meet her fiancé on board the Titanic for the first time, though she doesn’t want to go along with the arrangement for three reasons. He’s a stranger, she doesn’t love him, and she doesn’t feel comfortable with an arranged marriage.
On the journey, everything goes left, until she runs into the intimidating, handsome, and charming Augustine Winslow.
The whimsical unworldy Alva is scared, frightened because she feels attracted to this man, knowing she can’t let her mother down over this marriage. April 14th, the RMS Titanic staggers into a ice burg, sinking minute after minute. Her life will change forever, physical and mentally.
· Carrie on the other hand is mad and angry at her Mother for abandoing her for a great amount of years. Her mother is hiding something, something that will ruin her and Carrie’s relationship forever. Lies is all she hears from her mother, who she doesn’t even like to call mother. Titanic encounters the ice berg in the mix of the drama. She will be changed drastically.

Victoria: A Life

Acclaimed historian A. N. Wilson gives a sweeping, definitive biography of one of the most recognizable yet enigmatic monarchs of all time.

Both the longest reigning British monarch and female sovereign in history, Queen Victoria was a figure of profound paradox who has mystified historians for over a century. Now in this magisterial biography, A. N. Wilson rebukes the conventional wisdom about her life—that she was merely a “funny little woman in a bonnet” who did next to nothing—to show she was in fact intensely involved in state affairs despite a public façade of inaction. More than just the stock image of a stuffy, unsmiling widow in mourning, Wilson’s complete immersion in Victoria’s countless letters and journals reveals a carefully nuanced portrait of a monarch possessed by family immigrant insecurities, a reluctant public figure who learned to exploit public display, a mother who hated pregnancy, and above all, a political luminary who created and controlled the story of her life, true or otherwise.

Victoria brings to life its subject in all her many moods and phases: her so-called “miserable childhood,” her early years of political inexperience as a pawn to advisers and statesmen, her passionate marriage to Prince Albert and the incessant public criticism, her famed mourning period after Albert’s early death, and finally, the captivating last decades of her rule as Empress of India. After nearly two decades as an eccentric, reclusive mourner, she emerged self-confident and robust, as an out and out imperialist who harnessed royalty with British foreign policy, as the figurehead of military and economic world domination.

Wilson tells a story of victory against painful odds and gives the portrait of a woman battling with demons and overcoming them, largely alone. Despite everything, she came to embody the British people’s experience of their own lives. For those hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world, Queen Victoria transcended autocracy. She became the model for all future constitutional monarchies, a beloved leader who reflected back to the people their own experiences of passing time, their own values, and their own sense of the world. With dramatic sweep and novelistic style, Victoria: A Life is an accomplished work from one of our greatest biographers.

  • : A. N. Wilson
  • : Penguin Press
  • : 10/23/2014
  • : 159420599X
  • :
  • : bboughter@penguinrandomhouse.com
2017-04-18T18:34:13+00:00 History|0 Comments

George Washington: Gentleman Warrior

Winner of the prestigious George Washington Book Prize, George Washington is a vivid recounting of the formative years and military career of “The Father of his Country,” following his journey from brutal border skirmishes with the French and their Native American allies to his remarkable victory over the British Empire, an achievement that underpinned his selection as the first president of the United States of America. The book focuses on a side of Washington that is often overlooked: the feisty young frontier officer and the early career of the tough forty-something commander of the revolutionaries’ ragtag Continental Army.

  • : Stephen Brumwell
  • : Quercus
  • : 10/08/2013
  • : 162365100X
  • : B00C2CXFX
  • :
  • : dangertree@me.com
2014-07-06T05:11:33+00:00 Biography, History, Non-Fiction|0 Comments

Conversion

It’s senior year at St. Joan’s Academy, and school is a pressure cooker. College applications, the battle for valedictorian, deciphering boys’ texts: Through it all, Colleen Rowley and her friends are expected to keep it together. Until they can’t.

First it’s the school’s queen bee, Clara Rutherford, who suddenly falls into uncontrollable tics in the middle of class. Her mystery illness quickly spreads to her closest clique of friends, then more students and symptoms follow: seizures, hair loss, violent coughing fits. St. Joan’s buzzes with rumor; rumor blossoms into full-blown panic.

Soon the media descends on Danvers, Massachusetts, as everyone scrambles to find something, or someone, to blame. Pollution? Stress? Or are the girls faking? Only Colleen—who’s been reading The Crucible for extra credit—comes to realize what nobody else has: Danvers was once Salem Village, where another group of girls suffered from a similarly bizarre epidemic three centuries ago . . .

Inspired by true events—from seventeenth-century colonial life to the halls of a modern-day high school—Conversion casts a spell. With her signature wit and passion, New York Times bestselling author Katherine Howe delivers an exciting and suspenseful novel, a chilling mystery that raises the question, what’s really happening to the girls at St. Joan’s?

  • : Katherine Howe
  • : Penguin Teen
  • : 07/01/2014
  • : 0399167773
  • : B00FX7RB3O
  • :
  • : rocco.rivetti@red14films.com

The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau

Henri Rousseau wanted to be an artist. But he had no formal training. Instead, he taught himself to paint. He painted until the jungles and animals and distant lands in his head came alive on the space of his canvases.

Henri Rousseau endured the harsh critics of his day and created the brilliant paintings that now hang in museums around the world. Michelle Markel’s vivid text, complemented by the vibrant illustrations of Amanda Hall, artfully introduces young readers to the beloved painter and encourages all readers to persevere despite all odds.

  • : Michelle Markel (illustrated by Amanda Hall)
  • : Eerdmans Books for Young Readers
  • : 06/11/2012
  • : 0802853641
  • :
  • : webmaster@eerdmans.com

The War within These Walls

It’s World War II, and Misha’s family, like the rest of the Jews living in Warsaw, has been moved by the Nazis into a single crowded ghetto. Conditions are appalling: every day more people die from disease, starvation, and deportations. Misha does his best to help his family survive, even crawling through the sewers to smuggle food. When conditions worsen, Misha joins a handful of other Jews who decide to make a final, desperate stand against the Nazis.

Heavily illustrated with sober blue-and-white drawings, this powerful novel dramatically captures the brutal reality of a tragic historical event.

  • : Aline Sax (illustrated by Caryl Strzelecki, translated by Laura Watkinson)
  • : Eerdmans Books for Young Readers
  • : 10/16/2013
  • : 0802854281
  • :
  • : webmaster@eerdmans.com

Brother Hugo and the Bear

A clever tale that will charm book lovers

Brother Hugo can’t return his library book — the letters of St. Augustine — because, it turns out, the precious book has been devoured by a bear! Instructed by the abbot to borrow another monastery’s copy and create a replacement, the hapless monk painstakingly crafts a new book, copying it letter by letter and line by line. But when he sets off to return the borrowed copy, he finds himself trailed by his hungry new friend. Once a bear has a taste of letters, it appears, he’s rarely satisfied!

Brother Hugo and the Bear is loosely based on a note found in a twelfth-century manuscript — and largely on the creative imaginings of author Katy Beebe. Lavishly illustrated by S. D. Schindler in the style of medieval manuscripts, this humorous tale is sure to delight readers who have acquired their own taste for books.

  • : Katy Beebe
  • : Eerdmans Books for Young Readers
  • : 04/04/2014
  • : 0802854079
  • :
  • : webmaster@eerdmans.com